Falkland North: The details

On Thursday night, Home Properties rolled out details — and pictures — of their proposed development on the northeast corner of 16th Street and East-West Highway. Here’s the score.

According to reps for Home Properties, which owns all of Falkland Chase, the proposed Falkland North development would include:

Up to 1,020 rental apartments, most of them containing no more than two bedrooms.

fc_architecture.jpgFalkland North

Estimated monthly rents could range from $1,500 for a studio or small one-bedroom apartment, to $2,200 for a larger apartment. Pets would be allowed in some of those apartments.

A total of 128 units would be moderately priced, as the county requires. However, 80 of those units would be contained in existing buildings on Falkland Chase’s east and west parcels.

More than 60,000 square feet of street-level retail space along East West Highway.

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A Harris Teeter supermarket could occupy 50,000 square feet of that space. An additional 12,000 square feet would go to smaller retail shops.

Three levels of underground parking.

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Entrance to the garage would be through a driveway off East West Highway. Two levels would be reserved for residents. One level would be used for customers of the supermarket and other retailers.

Architecture by Grimm and Parker.

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Click the thumbnail above for a download-friendly image.
Or click here for the full Monty.

All of the buildings will be interconnected to form one large, semicircular complex. The tallest towers would reach 15 stories (143 feet), while two “bookend” buildings at East West Highway would be four stories each. The bookends would house all of the retail space.

A 1.5-acre courtyard.

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Currently, the courtyard has a pond and waterfall. However, Home Properties’ Nelson Leenhouts says the courtyard’s green space is flexible and open to suggestions.

A circular driveway also runs through the courtyard, giving access to building entrances and a ramp to the underground garage.

A service road off 16th Street, and wiggle room for the Purple Line.

The service road would be used for deliveries and trash removal. Space has been set aside for a proposed Purple Line light-rail route parallel to existing railroad tracks.

Images courtesy of Home Properties. Photos by Jennifer Deseo for The Silver Spring Penguin.

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8 Responses to “Falkland North: The details”

  1. Terry in Silver Spring says:

    “Entrance to the garage would be through a driveway off East West Highway.”

    This is what gives me nightmares. The entrance looks like it’s about at mid-block. Will they be putting a traffic light in? The number of cars going in and out of the garage during the rush hours will make traffic an even BIGGER mess.

  2. [...] and dirty after its August recess. On the docket: proposed deadline extensions on project plans for Falkland North and 8700 Georgia Ave. The straight up-or-down vote drops around 9:30 a.m. at Park and Planning HQ [...]

  3. [...] board meeting Thursday, commissioners voted to give the projects — one proposed for the north parcel of the Falkland Chase apartment complex, the other at 8700 Georgia Ave — extensions on their project plan [...]

  4. [...] commercial and economic development committee gets updates on two area projects: one at Falkland Chase’s north parcel, and South Silver Spring’s Galaxy development. The details hit at 7:30 p.m. at the Silver [...]

  5. [...] during the morning session, developers of the Bonifant Plaza and Falkland North projects request extensions on their project plan reviews. Bonifant Plaza’s developers need [...]

  6. New Comforter says:

    I’m a new resident at Falkland Chase Apartments. However, I’m a Native of D.C. and I know people that have lived in these buildings within the past 15 years, and have great things to say about it, still. When I decided to move to 1519 N. Falkland ln., I had no idea these plans were circulating.

    What made me choose my apartment was the fact that it was an older building that was “solid;” old walls, beautiful floors, and an architechtural set-up that allowed you to be involved with your neighbors without obligation. Forget about the trains! That’s nothingI In fact i can appreciate the old fashioned value of them as they , literally, pass by my windows.

    I have met more people in this community, that are friendly and open minded, than I’ve met in all the places I’ve lived within the DC metro area. I have lived in a brand new condo downtown and heard everthing my UNC grad neighbors had to say at 9 am sat morning (They hate each other). In my building, there is peace.

    Unlike my former downtown condo, that was brand new, I don’t hear everything through the walls. My Silver Sping apt. is not made of cheap material that was used to replace the solid structures of it’s predecesors.

    In the long run, it’s better for the environment to save the buildings that have already been established, and make them eco friendly. Tearing them down seems like it would do more damage for the envioroment and the community. Save what’s left of the good, old world, and make the new world, great. Stop tearing everything down. Save some of the past so we can learn from it/ our mistakes.

    It breaks my heart to know that the kind of place I have searched for, to live in peace, will soon be gone. All because we are over populated, spoiled, and someone wants to make money.

    What happened to not only family, but community values. The whole idea of “love Thy neighbor” has turned into “‘make love’ to thy neighbor,” your spouse will forgive you eventually. Tangent I know, but my brand new appartment, that i like, is under negotiation plans for a new condo building. It would be great if things could be left alone to be apprecitated and not replaced consistantly.

    TIME TO BUY!

  7. [...] Safeway in Fenton Village. Add to that a Harris Teeter, which could move into the proposed Falkland North project.The independent Sniders Super Market works Montgomery Hills, and Trader Joe’s rocks [...]

  8. chaz says:

    —–
    In the long run, it’s better for the environment to save the buildings that have already been established, and make them eco friendly. Tearing them down seems like it would do more damage for the envioroment and the community. Save what’s left of the good, old world, and make the new world, great. Stop tearing everything down. Save some of the past so we can learn from it/ our mistakes.
    —–

    NC, I know how difficult it is to find an apartment you like, and I dig old construction, too (lived in Rock Creek Springs for awhile), but you’re taking a pretty narrow view of the situation, and the above quote doesn’t make a lot of sense. The condos/apts that will go up there will hold a lot more people than the current buildings, and there are other old construction buildings around–not all of Falkland Chase is going to disappear completely, either. Whether or not the new building is a good community is on the shoulders of the people who move in.



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